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PHYS 1012 : Physics 1112 Supplement
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jim Baker
Provides auxiliary instruction and practice for PHYS 1112 and promotes a deep understanding of basic concepts in mechanics. Recommended for students who seek additional opportunities to engage with course content, to gain confidence in applying physics principals, or to develop their problem-solving skills. Class time is also spent exploring real-life applications and discussing strategies to be successful in PHYS 1112 .              
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PHYS 1012 : Physics 1112 Supplement
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jim Baker
Provides backup instruction for PHYS 1112. Recommended for students who either feel insecure about taking PHYS 1112 or simply want to develop their problem-solving skills. Emphasis is on getting the student to develop a deep understanding of basic concepts in mechanics. Class time is also spent looking at real life applications and discussing strategies to be successful in PHYS 1112.
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PHYS 1013 : Physics 2213 Supplement
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jim Baker
Provides auxiliary instruction and practice for PHYS 2213 and promotes a deep understanding of basic concepts in electromagnetism. Recommended for students who seek additional opportunities to engage with course content, to gain confidence in applying physics principals, or to develop their problem-solving skills. Class time is also spent exploring real-life applications and discussing strategies to be successful in PHYS 2213 .
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PHYS 1013 : Physics 2213 Supplement
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jim Baker
Provides backup instruction for PHYS 2213. Recommended for students who either feel insecure about taking PHYS 2213 or simply want to develop their problem-solving skills. Emphasis is on getting the student to develop a deep understanding of basic concepts in Electricity & Magnetism. Class time is also spent looking at real life applications and discussing strategies to be successful in PHYS 2213.
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PHYS 1101 : General Physics I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Nicholas Taylor
PHYS 1101 and PHYS 1102 emphasize both quantitative and conceptual understanding of the topics and tools of introductory physics developed without the use of calculus. The courses offer individualized instruction. Students learn through completing assigned readings, problems, and laboratory exercises, and through individualized tutoring. Additionally, recorded lectures, overview sessions, short videos, sample tests, and online tutorials are provided. The course format provides flexibility, but in some ways is more demanding than a course with a traditional format. Success requires discipline and well-developed study habits. Students without high school physics should allow extra time. Evaluation includes an oral lab check, a selection of graded homework problems, and a written test for each unit; these must be completed within a flexible set of deadlines. Major topics for PHYS 1101: forces and equilibrium, kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, fluid mechanics, waves and sound, thermal physics, and thermodynamics. At the level of College Physics vol. 1, 4th ed., by Giambattista, Richardson, and Richardson.
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PHYS 1102 : General Physics II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Nicholas Taylor
PHYS 1101 and PHYS 1102 emphasize quantitative and conceptual understanding of the topics and tools of introductory physics developed without use of calculus. The course offers individualized instruction. There are no scheduled lectures, discussion sections, or labs. Instruction occurs via one-on-one tutoring in the learning center, open Mon-Fri afternoons, Mon-Thurs evenings, and Sundays in fall and spring; Mon-Fri 9am-2pm in summer. Students learn through completing assigned readings, problems, and laboratory exercises and through individualized tutoring. Additionally, videotaped lectures, sample tests, overview sessions, and on-line tutorials are provided. The course format provides flexibility, but in some ways is more demanding than a course with a traditional format. Success requires discipline and well-developed study habits. Students without high school physics can succeed, but should allow extra time. Evaluation includes an oral notebook check and a written test for each unit; these must be completed within a flexible set of deadlines. Major topics for PHYS 1102: electric and magnetic forces and fields, electric currents and circuits, electromagnetic waves, optics, relativity, quantum physics, nuclear physics. At the level of College Physics vol. 2, fourth ed., by Giambattista, Richardson, and Richardson.
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PHYS 1112 : Physics I: Mechanics & Heat
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Philip Krasicky
First course in a three-semester introductory physics sequence. This course is taught in a largely "flipped', highly interactive manner, with reading preparation required for class. Covers the mechanics of particles with focus on kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws, central force fields, periodic motion. Mechanics of many-particle systems: center of mass, rotational mechanics of a rigid body, rotational equilibrium, and fluid mechanics.  Temperature, heat, the laws of thermodynamics. At the level of University Physics, Vol. 1, by Young and Freedman.
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PHYS 1112 : Physics I: Mechanics & Heat
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Robert Fulbright
First course in a three-semester introductory physic sequence. This course is taught in a largely "flipped', highly interactive manner, with reading preparation required for class. Covers the mechanics of particles with focus on kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws, central force fields, periodic motion. Mechanics of many-particle systems: center of mass, rotational mechanics of a rigid body, rotational equilibrium, and fluid mechanics.  Temperature, heat, the laws of thermodynamics. At the level of University Physics, Vol. 1, by Young and Freedman.
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PHYS 1116 : Physics I: Mechanics and Special Relativity
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jim Alexander
First in a three-semester introductory physics sequence. Explores quantitative modeling of the physical world through a study of mechanics. More mathematical and abstract than a typical mechanics course - for example, considers how choice of coordinate system (Cartesian, cylindrical, etc.) influences the nature of kinematical equations. Fast paced. Includes kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws, central force fields, periodic motion, and special relativity. At the level of An Introduction to Mechanics by Kleppner and Kolenkow.
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PHYS 1116 : Physics I: Mechanics and Special Relativity
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Liam McAllister
First in a three-semester introductory physics sequence. Explores quantitative modeling of the physical world through a study of mechanics. More mathematical and abstract than a typical mechanics course - for example, considers how choice of coordinate system (Cartesian, cylindrical, etc.) influences the nature of kinematical equations. Fast paced. Includes kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws, central force fields, periodic motion, and special relativity. At the level of An Introduction to Mechanics by Kleppner and Kolenkow.
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PHYS 1190 : Introductory Laboratory (Transfer Supplement)
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Students perform the laboratory component of one of the introductory courses (PHYS 1112, PHYS 2207, PHYS 2208, PHYS 2213, PHYS 2214) to complement the lecture-related course credit acquired elsewhere. Those wishing to take equivalent of one of these introductory courses at another institution should receive prior approval from the physics director of undergraduate studies.
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PHYS 1190 : Introductory Laboratory (Transfer Supplement)
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Students perform the laboratory component of one of the introductory courses (PHYS 1112, PHYS 2207, PHYS 2208, PHYS 2213, PHYS 2214) to complement the lecture-related course credit acquired elsewhere. Those wishing to take equivalent of one of these introductory courses at another institution should receive prior approval from the physics director of undergraduate studies.
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PHYS 1201 : Why the Sky Is Blue: Aspects of the Physical World
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Itai Cohen
The world around us is constantly in motion: from the random thermal jostling of atoms to the swimming of bacteria, or the dancing of a ballerina these motions depend strongly on the size of the moving object. What physical laws govern motions on these different length scales? Our class will approach this question from an experiential point of view making use of in class demonstrations, movies, and extracurricular projects where students will construct simple experiments. The course is aimed to spark the curiosity of the general non-science student to engage with and explore the world around them. 
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PHYS 1203 : Physics of the Heavens and the Earth
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Natasha Holmes
This course offers opportunities to face fundamental issues in scientific thought, and to provide a sense of the profound ideas that form the modern views of our world. Physics is not a collection of laws, or dry mathematical formulas that must be painfully memorized and exercised. Astronomy is not just a collection of fascinating, disconnected facts about our universe. This course introduces physics and astronomy as the development of a basic curiosity about our world, and a grand desire to understand how it works. A significant theme of this course will be: "How do we know?" This will include discussions of how we have come to know and how scientific thought and ideas have evolved as well as who has been involved in that evolution. In this course, we will evaluate the process of science through the lens of "modeling". In science, we can think of models as simplified representations of a phenomenon that can make new, testable predictions. The process of modeling in science is about iteratively developing, refining, and testing the limits of these models. We will evaluate cases of scientific modeling of the physics of the heavens and Earth, from Tycho Brahe's detailed observations of the motions of objects in the sky, to Newton's laws of motion, to Einstein's theory of general relativity. 
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PHYS 1204 : Physics of Musical Sound
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 1466 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Katherine Selby
Explores musical sound from a physics point of view. Topics include how various musical instruments work; pitch, timbre, scales, intervals, and tunings; hearing; human voice and room acoustics. This course is a Writing In The Majors Course: both science writing and physics problem-solving skills are developed through weekly assignments. Student activities include hands-on investigations of musical instruments and field trips. Students write a term paper investigating a topic of their choice. At the level of The Science of Sound by Rossing, Moore, and Wheeler.
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PHYS 2207 : Fundamentals of Physics I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Sol Gruner
PHYS 2207-PHYS 2208 is a two-semester introduction to physics, intended for students majoring in biological science, physical science, or mathematics. The course provides a rich exposure to the methods of physics and to the basic analytical and scientific communication skills required by all scientists. Lectures are illustrated with applications from the sciences, medicine, and everyday life. Labs highlight topics from the lectures and utilize computer-aided data acquisition and analysis. Recitation sections emphasize learning via cooperative problem-solving. The course covers mechanics, conservation laws, gravitation, fluids, oscillations and waves, acoustics and thermal physics. At the level of University Physics for the Physical and Life Sciences, Vol. I, by Kesten and Tauck.
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PHYS 2208 : Fundamentals of Physics II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Glenn Case
PHYS 2208 follows PHYS 2207 in the two-semester introduction to physics intended for students majoring in biological science, physical science, or mathematics. PHYS 2208 provides a rich exposure to the methods of physics and to the basic analytical and scientific skills required by all scientists. Lectures are highly interactive and illustrated with applications from the sciences, medicine, and everyday life. Labs highlight lecture topics via a hands-on environment. Recitation sections reinforce the lecture topics via cooperative problem-solving.   The course content includes electricity and magnetism, optics, and topics from quantum mechanics, nuclear physics and particle physics. 
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PHYS 2213 : Physics II: Electromagnetism
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Alan Giambattista
Second in a three semester introductory physics sequence.  Topics include electrostatics, behavior of matter in electric fields, DC circuits, magnetic fields, Faraday's law, AC circuits, and electromagnetic waves. At the level of University Physics, Vol. 2, by Young and Freedman, 13th ed.
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PHYS 2213 : Physics II: Electromagnetism
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Ivan Bazarov
Second in a three semester introductory physics sequence. Topics include electrostatics, behavior of matter in electric fields, DC circuits, magnetic fields, Faraday's law, AC circuits, and electromagnetic waves. At the level of University Physics, Vol. 2, by Young and Freedman, 13th ed.
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PHYS 2214 : Physics III: Oscillations, Waves, and Quantum Physics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Matthias Liepe
For majors in engineering (including bio-, civil, and environmental engineering), computer and information science, physics, earth and atmospheric science, and other physical and biological sciences who wish to understand the oscillation, wave, and quantum phenomena behind everyday experiences and modern technology including scientific/medical instrumentation. Covers the physics of oscillations and wave phenomena, including driven oscillations and resonance, mechanical waves, sound waves, electromagnetic waves, standing waves, Doppler effect, polarization, wave reflection and transmission, interference, diffraction, geometric optics and optical instruments, wave properties of particles, particles in potential wells, light emission and absorption, and quantum tunneling.  With applications to phenomena and measurement technologies in engineering, the physical sciences, and biological sciences.  Some familiarity with differential equations, complex representation of sinusoids, and Fourier analysis is desirable but not essential. As with PHYS 1112 and PHYS 2213, pre-class preparation involves reading notes and/or watching videos, and in-class activities focus on problem solving, demonstrations, and applications.
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PHYS 2214 : Physics III: Oscillations, Waves, and Quantum Physics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Glenn Case
For majors in engineering (including bio-, civil, and environmental engineering), computer and information science, physics, earth and atmospheric science, and other physical and biological sciences who wish to understand the oscillation, wave, and quantum phenomena behind everyday experiences and modern technology including scientific/medical instrumentation. Covers the physics of oscillations and wave phenomena, including driven oscillations and resonance, mechanical waves, sound waves, electromagnetic waves, standing waves, Doppler effect, polarization, wave reflection and transmission, interference, diffraction, geometric optics and optical instruments, wave properties of particles, particles in potential wells, light emission and absorption, and quantum tunneling.  With applications to phenomena and measurement technologies in engineering, the physical sciences, and biological sciences.  Some familiarity with differential equations, complex representation of sinusoids, and Fourier analysis is desirable but not essential. As with PHYS 1112 and PHYS 2213, pre-class preparation involves reading notes and/or watching videos, and in-class activities focus on problem solving, demonstrations, and applications.
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PHYS 2216 : Introduction to Special Relativity
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Robert Fulbright
Introduction to Einstein's Theory of Special Relativity, including Galilean and Lorentz transformations, the concept of simultaneity, time dilation and Lorentz contraction, the relativistic transformations of velocity, momentum and energy, and relativistic invariance in the laws of physics. At the level of An Introduction to Mechanics by Kleppner and Kolenkow.
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PHYS 2216 : Introduction to Special Relativity
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Robert Fulbright
Introduction to Einstein's Theory of Special Relativity, including Galilean and Lorentz transformations, the concept of simultaneity, time dilation and Lorentz contraction, the relativistic transformations of velocity, momentum and energy, and relativistic invariance in the laws of physics. At the level of An Introduction to Mechanics by Kleppner and Kolenkow.
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PHYS 2217 : Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism
Crosslisted as: AEP 2170 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Chris Xu
Second in a three semester introductory physics sequence. Explores quantitative modeling of the physical world through a study of electricity and magnetism. More mathematical and abstract than a typical introductory electricity and magnetism course. Topics include electrostatics, behavior of matter in electric fields, circuits, magnetic fields, Faraday's law, AC circuits, and electromagnetic waves. Makes substantial use of vector calculus. At the level of Electricity and Magnetism by Purcell.
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PHYS 2217 : Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism
Crosslisted as: AEP 2170 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Michael Niemack
Second in a three semester introductory physics sequence. Explores quantitative modeling of the physical world through a study of electricity and magnetism. More mathematical and abstract than a typical introductory electricity and magnetism course. Topics include electrostatics, behavior of matter in electric fields, circuits, magnetic fields, Faraday's law, AC circuits, and electromagnetic waves. Makes substantial use of vector calculus. At the level of Electricity and Magnetism by Purcell.
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PHYS 2218 : Physics III: Waves and Thermal Physics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Brad Ramshaw
This course is divided into two parts. The larger segment of the course typically focuses on wave phenomena. Topics include coupled harmonic oscillators, strings, sound and light waves, superposition principle, wave equations, Fourier series and transforms, diffraction and interference. The discussion is at the level of The Physics of Waves by Georgi. The second segment of the course covers thermodynamics and statistical mechanics at the level of Thermal Physics by Schroeder.
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PHYS 2218 : Physics III: Waves and Thermal Physics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Andre Leclair
This course is divided into two parts. The larger segment of the course typically focuses on wave phenomena. Topics include coupled harmonic oscillators, strings, sound and light waves, superposition principle, wave equations, Fourier series and transforms, diffraction and interference. The discussion is at the level of The Physics of Waves by Georgi. The second segment of the course covers thermodynamics and statistical mechanics at the level of Thermal Physics by Schroeder.
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PHYS 3310 : Experiments in Quantum Physics and Electrodynamics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Carl Franck
This is a laboratory course exploring quantum physics and electrodynamics.  Students select 3 labs from approximately 15 available labs that are well-matched to the content of the 3000-level core physics courses for sophomores and juniors, particularly PHYS 3316, PHYS 3317, PHYS 3323, and PHYS 3327. Helps develop a strong physical understanding of the theoretical concepts taught in these core courses.  Emphasis is on using the experiments as tools to illuminate underlying physical principles, integrating physics knowledge accumulated in an uncorrelated way from many courses, and learning good experimental practice.
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PHYS 3316 : Basics of Quantum Mechanics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Katja Nowack
Topics include breakdown of classical concepts in microphysics; light quanta and matter waves; Schrödinger equation and solutions for square well, harmonic oscillator, and the hydrogen atom; wave packets, scattering and tunneling effects, angular momentum, spin, and magnetic moments. At the level of An Introduction to Quantum Physics by French and Taylor and Introduction to Quantum Physics by Griffiths.
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PHYS 3316 : Basics of Quantum Mechanics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Tomas Arias
Topics include breakdown of classical concepts in microphysics; light quanta and matter waves; Schrödinger equation and solutions for square well, harmonic oscillator, and the hydrogen atom; wave packets, scattering and tunneling effects, angular momentum, spin, and magnetic moments. At the level of An Introduction to Quantum Physics by French and Taylor and Introduction to Quantum Physics by Griffiths.
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PHYS 3317 : Applications of Quantum Mechanics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Peter Wittich
Covers a number of applications of quantum mechanics to topics in modern physics. Uses the tools developed in PHYS 3316, and does not introduce new formalism. Topics include: the physics of single and multi-electron atoms, introduction to quantum statistics, band theory of solids, superconductivity, nuclear structure, elementary particle physics, and quantum computing.  Computational tools will be used to gain insights into the behavior of quantum systems. Previous familiarity with programing is a plus, though the course is self-contained. Students will develop their order-of-magnitude reasoning, and their modeling skills.
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PHYS 3318 : Analytical Mechanics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jared Maxson
Covers Newtonian mechanics of particles and systems of particles, including Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations, conservation laws from symmetries, with applications to two-body orbits in a central force, systems undergoing small amplitude oscillations, rigid body motion, motion in non-inertial reference frames, perturbation theory, and nonlinear behavior. Both analytical and numerical methods for solving problems in mechanics are covered. At the level of Classical Mechanics by Goldstein, Mechanics by Landau and Lifshitz, and Analytical Mechanics by Hand and Finch.
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PHYS 3323 : Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
J.C. Seamus Davis
A survey of electricity and magnetism that exploits the student's growing mathematical capability in order to explore the electromagnetic properties of of matter and vacuum  and their consequences.  Topics include electro/magnetostatics, boundary value problems, dielectric and magnetic media, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, including guided waves, and sources and sinks of electromagnetic radiation. At the level of Introduction to Electrodynamics by Griffiths.
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PHYS 3327 : Advanced Electricity and Magnetism
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Lawrence Gibbons
Focuses on advanced electro/magnetostatics, such as vector and scalar potentials and multipole expansion of the potential solutions to Laplace's Equation and boundary value problems, as well as  time-dependent electrodynamics: Maxwell's Equations, electromagnetic waves, reflection and refraction, wave guides,  and generation of electromagnetic radiation (retarded potential). As time permits, topics will be drawn from antennas, relativistic electrodynamics, four vectors, Lorentz, and transformation of fields based on the interest of the class.  At the level of Classical Electromagnetic Radiation by Heald and Marion or the more advanced chapters of Introduction to Electrodynamics by Griffiths.
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PHYS 3330 : Modern Experimental Optics
Crosslisted as: AEP 3300 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jared Maxson
A practical laboratory course in basic and modern optics. Students use lasers and basic optical bench equipment to cover a wide range of topics from geometrical optics to interference, diffraction, and polarization. Each experimental setup is equipped with standard, off-the-shelf optics and opto-mechanical components to provide the students with hands-on experience in practical laboratory techniques currently employed in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Students are also introduced to digital imaging and image processing techniques. Five projects are prescribed and one last project defined and designed by the student with help from the instructor. Each project will be documented by a professional laboratory notebook and a detailed scientific report. At the level of Optics by Hecht.
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PHYS 3360 : Electronic Circuits
Crosslisted as: AEP 3630 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Georg Hoffstaetter
Practical electronics as encountered in a scientific or engineering research/development environment. Analyze, design, build, and test circuits using discrete components and integrated circuits. Analog circuits: resistors, capacitors, operational amplifiers, feedback amplifiers, oscillators, comparators, passive and active filters, diodes, and transistor switches and amplifiers. Digital circuits: combinational and sequential logic (gates, flipflops, registers, counters, timers), analog to digital (ADC) and digital to analog (DAC) conversion, signal averaging, and computer architecture and interfacing. Additional topics may include analog and digital signal processing, light wave communications, transducers, noise reduction techniques, and computer-aided circuit design. At the level of Art of Electronics by Horowitz and Hill.
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PHYS 3360 : Electronic Circuits
Crosslisted as: AEP 3630 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Earl Kirkland
Practical electronics as encountered in a scientific or engineering research/development environment. Analyze, design, build, and test circuits using discrete components and integrated circuits. Analog circuits: resistors, capacitors, operational amplifiers, feedback amplifiers, oscillators, comparators, passive and active filters, diodes, and transistor switches and amplifiers. Digital circuits: combinational and sequential logic (gates, flipflops, registers, counters, timers), analog to digital (ADC) and digital to analog (DAC) conversion, signal averaging, and computer architecture and interfacing. Additional topics may include analog and digital signal processing, light wave communications, transducers, noise reduction techniques, and computer-aided circuit design. At the level of Art of Electronics by Horowitz and Hill.
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PHYS 4230 : Statistical Thermodynamics
Crosslisted as: AEP 4230 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Robert Buhrman
Quantum statistical basis for equilibrium thermodynamics, microcanonical, canonical and grand canonical ensembles, and partition functions. Classical and quantum ideal gases, paramagnetic and multiple-state systems. Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein statistics and applications. Introduction to systems of interacting particles. At the level of Introductory Statistical Mechanics by Bowley and Sanchez.
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PHYS 4400 : Informal Advanced Laboratory
Crosslisted as: PHYS 4410, PHYS 6510, PHYS 6500 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Michael Niemack
Experiments of widely varying difficulty in one or more areas, as listed under PHYS 4410, may be done to fill the student's special requirements.
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PHYS 4400 : Informal Advanced Laboratory
Crosslisted as: PHYS 4410, PHYS 6510 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jim Alexander
Experiments of widely varying difficulty in one or more areas, as listed under PHYS 4410, may be done to fill the student's special requirements.
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PHYS 4410 : Advanced Experimental Physics
Crosslisted as: PHYS 4400, PHYS 6510, PHYS 6500 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Michael Niemack
Over 50 available experiments on various topics including atomic and molecular spectroscopy, optics, condensed matter physics, nuclear physics, electrical and microwave circuits, x-rays, and magnetic resonance. Each student selects and performs three experiments. Independent work is stressed, and scientific writing and presentation skills are emphasized. Weekly lectures will cover techniques and skills necessary for the class and experimental physics in general.
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PHYS 4410 : Advanced Experimental Physics
Crosslisted as: PHYS 4400, PHYS 6510 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jim Alexander
Over 50 available experiments on various topics including atomic and molecular spectroscopy, optics, condensed matter physics, nuclear physics, electrical and microwave circuits, x-rays, and magnetic resonance. Each student selects and performs three experiments. Independent work is stressed, and scientific writing and presentation skills are emphasized. Weekly lectures will cover techniques and skills necessary for the class and experimental physics in general.
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PHYS 4433 : Introduction to Cosmology
Crosslisted as: ASTRO 4433 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Nicholas Battaglia
An introduction to theoretical and observational cosmology aimed at interested science and engineering majors. Topics include an introduction to general relativity as applied to the cosmos; the cosmic expansion history and how it relates to the nature of matter in the universe; processes in the early universe; how galaxies and clusters of galaxies form; current and prospective cosmological surveys of galaxies, galaxy clusters, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The material is at a less technical level than the graduate cosmology course ASTRO 6599.
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PHYS 4443 : Intermediate Quantum Mechanics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kin Fai Mak
Provides an introduction to concepts and techniques of quantum mechanics, at the level of An Introduction to Quantum Mechanics by Griffiths.
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PHYS 4444 : Introduction to Particle Physics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Anders Ryd
Covers the standard model of particle physics; Introduction to fields and particles and relativistic Quantum Mechanics; Symmetries in physics; Basic introduction the Feynman diagrams. At the level of Introduction to Elementary Particles by Griffiths or Modern Elementary Particle Physics by Kane.
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PHYS 4445 : Introduction to General Relativity
Crosslisted as: ASTRO 4445 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Thomas Hartman
One-semester introduction to general relativity that develops the essential structure and phenomenology of the theory without requiring prior exposure to tensor analysis. General relativity is a fundamental cornerstone of physics that underlies several of the most exciting areas of current research, including relativistic astrophysics, cosmology, and the search for a quantum theory of gravity. The course briefly reviews special relativity, introduces basic aspects of differential geometry, including metrics, geodesics, and the Riemann tensor, describes black hole spacetimes and cosmological solutions, and concludes with the Einstein equation and its linearized gravitational wave solutions. At the level of Gravity: An Introduction to Einstein's General Relativity by Hartle.
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PHYS 4454 : Introductory Solid State Physics
Crosslisted as: AEP 4500 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Craig Fennie
Introduction the physics of crystalline solids. Covers crystal structures; electronic states; lattice vibrations; and metals, insulators, and semiconductors. Covers optical properties, magnetism, and superconductivity as time allows. The majority of the course addresses the foundations of the subject, but time is devoted to modern and/or technologically important topics such as quantum size effects. At the level of Introduction to Solid State Physics by Kittel or Solid State Physics by Ashcroft and Mermin.
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PHYS 4480 : Computational Physics
Crosslisted as: ASTRO 7690, PHYS 7680 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Saul Teukolsky
Covers numerical methods for ordinary and partial differential equations, linear algebra and eigenvalue problems, integration, nonlinear equations, optimization, and fast Fourier transforms. Find out how and why the "black-box" numerical routines you use work, how to improve and generalize them, and how to fix them when they don't. Based on the text Numerical Recipes by William H. Press, Saul A. Teukolsky, William T. Vetterling, and Brian P. Flannery.
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PHYS 4484 : Teaching and Learning Physics
Crosslisted as: PHYS 7684 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Robert Thorne
This 1.5-hour weekly seminar provides undergraduate and graduate students with an introduction to core concepts in physics education. Participants discuss articles and videos drawn from physics and science education research and from cognitive science, and engage in collaborative activities that help them become more effective teachers, communicators and learners. This seminar is especially valuable for those considering teaching physics at some point in their careers. Topics include: Questioning Strategies, Classroom Discourse, Teaching through misconceptions, Argumentation approach to instruction, Learning Theory, Conceptions and Conceptual Change and Fixed vs Growth Mind-set, Science Communication. Text: Articles from science, engineering, and math education journals.
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PHYS 4484 : Teaching and Learning Physics
Crosslisted as: PHYS 7684, PHYS 7684, PHYS 7684 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Robert Thorne
This 1.5-hour weekly seminar provides undergraduate and graduate students with an introduction to core concepts in teaching and learning physics. Participants read and discuss articles and videos, reflect on their own teaching and learning experiences, and engage in collaborative activities that help them become more effective teachers, learners, and communicators. This seminar is especially valuable for those considering teaching physics at some point in their careers, or who want to improve their own physics learning skills. Topics may include: question types and questioning strategies; classroom discourse; neurological basis of learning; expertise acquisition and expert performance; deliberate practice; misconceptions, mental models and conceptual change; mindsets and psychological interventions; classroom diversity and microaggressions; multiple intelligences and multiple representations; metacognition; active learning; the nature of science; the qualities of effective teachers; and evaluating teaching and learning.
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PHYS 4485 : Teaching Experience I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jim Baker
Designed to provide qualified undergraduate students who possess an interest in teaching with a structured experience teaching physics.  Participants collaborate with instructors and graduate teaching assistants to facilitate cooperative learning sessions, laboratory investigations, or homework help sessions.  Total weekly time commitment is 3-4 hours, including instructional contact time (2 hours), preparation time, and instructional staff meeting time.
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PHYS 4485 : Teaching Experience I
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jim Baker
Designed to give qualified undergraduate students with an interest in teaching careers a structured introduction to teaching physics.  This experience includes attending and participating in weekly course staff meetings, partnering with a graduate teaching assistant in teaching cooperative learning sessions or laboratories in PHYS 1112, PHYS 1116, PHYS 1117, PHYS 2207, PHYS 2208, PHYS 2213, PHYS 2214, or PHYS 3316 and mentoring by a master physics teacher.  Total weekly time commitment is 3-4 hours, including staff meeting time, preparation time and 2 hours of contact time.
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PHYS 4486 : Teaching Experience II
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Nicholas Taylor
Teaching experience for qualified undergraduate students in PHYS 1101/PHYS 1102. Contact time will be in the course's Learning Center, in a team environment with graduate student TAs and faculty. Activities include tutoring individual students, working with small groups, assisting students with lab experiments, and participating in course development initiatives.
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PHYS 4486 : Teaching Experience II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Nicholas Taylor
Teaching experience for qualified undergraduate students in PHYS 1101/PHYS 1102.  Contact time will be in the course's Learning Center, in a team environment with graduate student TAs and faculty. Activities include tutoring individual students, working with small groups, assisting students with lab experiments, and participating in course development initiatives.
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PHYS 4487 : Teaching Experience III
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Nicholas Taylor
Continuation of PHYS 4486. Teaching experience for qualified undergraduate students to help with PHYS 1101/PHYS 1102. Contact time will be in the course's Learning Center, in a team environment with graduate student TAs and faculty. Activities include tutoring individual students, working with small groups, assisting students with lab experiments, and participating in course development initiatives.Continuation of PHYS 4486. Teaching experience for qualified undergraduate students in PHYS 1101/PHYS 1102. Contact time will be in the course's Learning Center, in a team environment with graduate student TAs and faculty. Activities include tutoring individual students, working with small groups, assisting students with lab experiments, and participating in course development initiatives.
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PHYS 4487 : Teaching Experience III
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Nicholas Taylor
Continuation of PHYS 4486 . Teaching experience for qualified undergraduate students to help with PHYS 1101/PHYS 1102. Contact time will be in the course's Learning Center, in a team environment with graduate student TAs and faculty. Activities include tutoring individual students, working with small groups, assisting students with lab experiments, and participating in course development initiatives.
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PHYS 4488 : Statistical Mechanics
Crosslisted as: PHYS 6562 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
James Sethna
This course focuses on those topics in statistical mechanics of interest to scholars in many fields. Topics include random walks and emergent properties; temperature and equilibrium; phase space dynamics and ergodicity; entropy; free energies; quantum statistical mechanics; calculation and computation; order parameters, broken symmetries, and topology; correlations, response, and dissipation; abrupt phase transitions; and continuous phase transitions, fractals, and the renormalization group. Taught in conjunction with the graduate course PHYS 6562, this version is advised for undergraduates and interested graduates outside of Physics.
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PHYS 4490 : Independent Study in Physics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jim Alexander
Tomas Arias
Ivan Bazarov
Itai Cohen
Csaba Csaki
Veit Elser
Eanna Flanagan
Carl Franck
Lawrence Gibbons
Paul Ginsparg
Yuval Grossman
Sol Gruner
Thomas Hartman
Georg Hoffstaetter
Natasha Holmes
Eun-Ah Kim
Andre Leclair
G Lepage
Matthias Liepe
Kin Fai Mak
Jared Maxson
Liam McAllister
Paul McEuen
Erich Mueller
Michael Niemack
Katja Nowack
Jeevak Parpia
Ritchie Patterson
Maxim Perelstein
Dan Ralph
Brad Ramshaw
David Rubin
Anders Ryd
James Sethna
Kyle Shen
Nicholas Taylor
Saul Teukolsky
Robert Thorne
Jane Wang
Peter Wittich
Peter McMahon
David Chernoff
Andrej Singer
Individual project work (reading or laboratory) in any branch of physics.  Products vary, but may include a thesis. Evaluation criteria are decided between student and faculty member.
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PHYS 4490 : Independent Study in Physics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Eanna Flanagan
Carl Franck
Andrej Singer
Matthias Liepe
Maxim Perelstein
Robert Thorne
Yuval Grossman
Dan Ralph
Michael Niemack
Kyle Shen
David Rubin
Ivan Bazarov
Mike Thompson
Francesco Monticone
Saul Teukolsky
Anders Ryd
Itai Cohen
Lawrence Gibbons
Guillaume Lambert
Thomas Hartman
Georg Hoffstaetter
Katja Nowack
Tomas Arias
Erich Mueller
Jared Maxson
Natasha Holmes
Brad Ramshaw
Veit Elser
Nicholas Taylor
Jeevak Parpia
J.C. Seamus Davis
Sol Gruner
Individual project work (reading or laboratory) in any branch of physics.  Products vary, but may include a thesis. Evaluation criteria are decided between student and faculty member.
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PHYS 4498 : Senior Thesis
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jim Alexander
David Chernoff
Eun-Ah Kim
Liam McAllister
Maxim Perelstein
Gennady Shvets
Saul Teukolsky
Ira Wasserman
The first half of a two-semester thesis course involving physics-related research under the direct supervision of a faculty member. The thesis research may take many forms including but not restricted to : theoretical calculations, design of instrumentation, experimental research, or numerical simulations. Students wishing to pursue the senior thesis must submit a proposal, with the approval of a faculty supervisor, in spring of their junior year. Completion of the Senior Thesis requires : 1) 3 units of 4498 and 3 units of 4499 (total of 6 credits for the year), 2) a written thesis document and 3) and an oral presentation.
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PHYS 6500 : Informal Graduate Laboratory
Crosslisted as: PHYS 4400, PHYS 4410, PHYS 6510 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Michael Niemack
Experiments of widely varying difficulty in one or more areas, as listed under PHYS 6510, may be done to fill special requirements.
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PHYS 6500 : Informal Graduate Laboratory
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jim Alexander
Experiments of widely varying difficulty in one or more areas, as listed under PHYS 6510, may be done to fill special requirements.
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PHYS 6510 : Advanced Experimental Physics
Crosslisted as: PHYS 4400, PHYS 4410, PHYS 6500 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Michael Niemack
Over 50 available experiments on various topics including atomic and molecular spectroscopy, optics, condensed matter physics, nuclear physics, electrical and microwave circuits, x-rays, and magnetic resonance. Each student selects and performs three experiments. Independent work is stressed, and scientific writing and presentation skills are emphasized. Weekly lectures will cover techniques and skills necessary for the class and experimental physics in general.
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PHYS 6510 : Advanced Experimental Physics
Crosslisted as: PHYS 4400, PHYS 4410 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jim Alexander
Over 50 available experiments on various topics including atomic and molecular spectroscopy, optics, condensed matter physics, nuclear physics, electrical and microwave circuits, x-rays, and magnetic resonance. Each student selects and performs three experiments. Independent work is stressed, and scientific writing and presentation skills are emphasized. Weekly lectures will cover techniques and skills necessary for the class and experimental physics in general.
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PHYS 6520 : Projects in Experimental Physics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Projects of modern topical interest that involve some independent development work by student. Opportunity for more initiative in experimental work than is possible in PHYS 6510.
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PHYS 6520 : Projects in Experimental Physics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Projects of modern topical interest that involve some independent development work by student. Opportunity for more initiative in experimental work than is possible in PHYS 6510.
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PHYS 6554 : General Relativity II
Crosslisted as: ASTRO 6510 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Thomas Hartman
A continuation of PHYS 6553 and ASTRO 6509 that covers a variety of advanced topics and applications of general relativity in astrophysics, cosmology, and high-energy physics.
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PHYS 6561 : Classical Electrodynamics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Csaba Csaki
Covers special relativity, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic potentials, conservation laws, Green's functions, electromagnetic waves, dispersion, radiation theory, and scattering. The practical application of appropriate mathematical methods is emphasized. At the level of Classical Electrodynamics by Jackson.
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PHYS 6562 : Statistical Physics I
Crosslisted as: PHYS 4488 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
James Sethna
A broad, graduate level view of statistical mechanics, with applications to not only physics and chemistry, but to computation, mathematics, dynamical and complex systems, and biology. Some traditional focus areas will not be covered in detail (thermodynamics, phase diagrams, perturbative methods, interacting gasses and liquids).  
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PHYS 6572 : Quantum Mechanics I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Eun-Ah Kim
First part of the two-semester graduate quantum mechanics sequence. Covers non-relativistic quantum physics, focusing on fundamental conceptual issues and methods. Topics include: fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics using the Dirac notation, theory of angular momentum and spin, symmetries,  approximation methods and identical particles, at the level of Sakurai Modern Quantum Mechanics.
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PHYS 6574 : Applications of Quantum Mechanics II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
David Rubin
Possible topics include identical particles, many electron atoms, second quantization, quantization of the electromagnetic field, scattering of complex systems, radiative transitions, and introduction to the Dirac equation.
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PHYS 7601 : Foundations of Fluid Mechanics I
Crosslisted as: MAE 6010 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Olivier Desjardins
Foundations of fluid mechanics from an advanced viewpoint, including formulation of continuum fluid dynamics; kinematic descriptions of fluid flow, derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations and energy equation for compressible fluids; and sound waves, viscous flows, boundary layers, and potential flows.
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PHYS 7635 : Solid-State Physics I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Dan Ralph
Survey of the physics of solids: crystal structures, X-ray diffraction, phonons, and electrons. Selected topics from semiconductors, magnetism, superconductivity, disordered materials, topological materials, and mesoscopic physics. The focus is to enable graduate research at the current frontiers of condensed matter physics.  In addition to the course lectures, students are expected to attend either the LASSP/AEP seminar at 12:20 pm on Tuesdays or the weekly research seminar for their home department.  An optional study hall/homework section will be held 2-3 pm on Thursdays.
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PHYS 7636 : Solid-State Physics II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Eun-Ah Kim
Continuation of PHYS 7635. Topics include theory of measurements such as response and correlation, spontaneous symmetry breaking, superconductivity, free fermion and interacting topological phases.
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PHYS 7645 : An Introduction to the Standard Model of Particle Physics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Yuval Grossman
This course is an introduction to the Standard Model of particle physics. Familiarity with Feynman rules, Lagrangians, and relativistic wave equations at the level of PHYS 7651 is required. Topics covered include strong and electro-weak interactions, Higgs mechanism, and phenomenology of weak interactions, the quark model, and particle detectors. The course is taught at the level of Particle Physics: A Comprehensive Introduction by Abe Seiden, and The Standard Model and Beyond by Paul Langacker.
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PHYS 7651 : Relativistic Quantum Field Theory I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Maxim Perelstein
Introduction to relativistic quantum field theory for applications in particle physics. Topics include quantization of Klein-Gordon, Dirac and gauge fields, Lorentz invariance in quantum theory, perturbation theory, Feynman diagrams, calculation of decay rates and cross sections, and an introduction to radiative corrections, renormalization and effective field theories. At the level of Quantum Field Theory and the Standard Model by Schwartz.
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PHYS 7652 : Relativistic Quantum Field Theory II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Csaba Csaki
A continuation of PHYS 7651. Introduces more advanced methods and concepts in quantum field theory. Topics include functional integral methods, quantization of spin-1 fields, quantum electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge theories, renormalization group techniques, spontaneous symmetry breaking, and anomalies.  At the level of An Introduction to Quantum Field Theory by Peskin and Schroeder.  
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PHYS 7653 : Statistical Physics II
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Veit Elser
An advanced, graduate-level exploration of selected topics in statistical mechanics -- topics such as renormalization-group methods, computational methods, machine learning, quantum criticality, conformal bootstrap methods, etc.
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PHYS 7654 : Basic Training in Condensed Matter Physics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Veit Elser
Advanced topics in condensed-matter physics are taught by several members of the faculty. Past modules include random matrix theory, the quantum Hall effect, disordered systems and computational complexity, asymptotic analysis, superfluid physics, generalized rigidity, many-body methods applied to nanotubes, constraint problems, quantum optics, Luttinger liquids, and quantum antiferromagnets. Future topics may include dilute cold gases and exotic quantum phenomena, thermodynamic Green's functions, 1/N expansions, density functional theory, instantons, dynamical mean-field theory, conformal field theory, Fermi liquid theory and superconductivity, localization and disordered metals, renormalization groups, duality transformations, and Chern-Simons gauge theory. Detailed course content will be announced at the end of the fall semester.
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PHYS 7667 : Theory of Stellar Structure and Evolution
Crosslisted as: ASTRO 6560 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Ira Wasserman
Intended to provide a systematic development of stellar astrophysics, both theory and observations. Topics include hydrostatic equilibrium; equation of state; radiation transfer and atmospheres; convection and stellar turbulence; nuclear burning and nucleosynthesis; solar neutrinos; star formation; pre-main sequence stars; brown dwarfs; end states of stellar evolution (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes); supernovae; interacting binary stars; stellar rotation and magnetic fields; stellar pulsations; winds and outflows.
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PHYS 7679 : Finding Your Scientific Voice
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Itai Cohen
Description
PHYS 7680 : Computational Physics
Crosslisted as: ASTRO 7690, PHYS 4480 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Saul Teukolsky
Covers numerical methods for ordinary and partial differential equations, linear algebra and eigenvalue problems, integration, nonlinear equations, optimization, and fast Fourier transforms. Find out how and why the "black-box" numerical routines you use work, how to improve and generalize them, and how to fix them when they don't. Based on the text Numerical Recipes by William H. Press, Saul A. Teukolsky, William T. Vetterling, and Brian P. Flannery.
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PHYS 7684 : Teaching and Learning Physics
Crosslisted as: PHYS 4484 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Robert Thorne
This 1.5-hour weekly seminar provides undergraduate and graduate students with an introduction to core concepts in physics education. Participants discuss articles and videos drawn from physics and science education research and from cognitive science, and engage in collaborative activities that help them become more effective teachers, communicators and learners. This seminar is especially valuable for those considering teaching physics at some point in their careers. Topics include: Questioning Strategies, Classroom Discourse, Teaching through misconceptions, Argumentation approach to instruction, Learning Theory, Conceptions and Conceptual Change and Fixed vs Growth Mind-set, Science communication. Text: Articles from science, engineering, and math education journals.
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PHYS 7684 : Teaching and Learning Physics
Crosslisted as: PHYS 4484, PHYS 4484, PHYS 4484 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Robert Thorne
This 1.5-hour weekly seminar provides undergraduate and graduate students with an introduction to core concepts in physics education. Participants discuss articles and videos drawn from physics and science education research and from cognitive science, and engage in collaborative activities that help them become more effective teachers, communicators and learners. This seminar is especially valuable for those considering teaching physics at some point in their careers. Topics include: Questioning Strategies, Classroom Discourse, Teaching through misconceptions, Argumentation approach to instruction, Learning Theory, Conceptions and Conceptual Change and Fixed vs Growth Mind-set, Science communication. Text: Articles from science, engineering, and math education journals.
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PHYS 7685 : Special Topics in Physics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Maxim Perelstein
Offerings are announced each semester. Typical topics are group theory, analyticity in particle physics, weak interactions, superfluids, stellar evolution, surface physics, Monte Carlo methods, low-temperature physics, magnetic resonance, phase transitions, and the renormalization group.
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PHYS 7688 : Topics in Accelerator Physics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Georg Hoffstaetter
After an introduction to the history of particle accelerators and to their fundamental physical principles, special topics in accelerator physics will be covered. Such topics are microwave structures in particle acceleration, linear and nonlinear beam dynamics, collective effects and beam instabilities, characteristics of synchrotron radiation, a project in storage ring design, and experiments with charged particle beams at Cornell's accelerator laboratory.
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PHYS 7690 : Independent Study in Physics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Saul Teukolsky
Special graduate study in some branch of physics, either theoretical or experimental, under the direction of any professorial member of the staff.
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PHYS 7690 : Independent Study in Physics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Natasha Holmes
Special graduate study in some branch of physics, either theoretical or experimental, under the direction of any professorial member of the staff.
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